Essentialism by Greg McKeown – Learned in Primary 007

Welcome to Learned in Primary, where we discuss that everything we know we learned in primary. This podcast focuses on the things that we are learning as adults that remind us of what we learned as children growing up in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Join hosts Jethro Jones and Tom Bay as they discuss the current hot topics in thought leadership and how they relate to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

You can follow the show on twitter @learnedprimary and follow the hosts @tommybay and @jethrojones. If you like what you are hearing, please subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and share it with your friends.

In this episode we discuss “Essentialism” by Greg McKeown . This podcast is not affiliated with the author of the book or the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Jethro’s Takeaways
1. Essential Intent: Make one decision that eliminates 1000 later decisions. “Remember, when we forfeit our right to choose, someone else will choose for us. So we can either deliberately choose what not to do or allow ourselves to be pulled in directions we don’t want to go.”? 2. Trade-off (Chapter 4)? >In the simplest terms, straddling means keeping your existing strategy intact while simultaneously also trying to adopt the strategy of a competitor. Matt 6:24
3. Buffer (Chapter 15)? >From chemistry we know that gases expand to fill the space they are in; similarly, we’ve all experienced how projects and commitments tend to expand—despite our best efforts—to fill the amount of time allotted to them.
4. The Essentialist (Chapter 1)? >“Why is it,” I wonder, “that we have so much more ability inside of us than we often choose to utilize?” And “How can we make the choices that allow us to tap into more of the potential inside ourselves, and in people everywhere?”
5. The Now?

“Think about how this might apply in your own life. Have you ever become trapped reliving past mistakes … over and over like a video player, stuck on endless replay? Do you spend time and energy worrying about the future? Do you spend more time thinking about the things you can’t control rather than the things you can control about the areas where your efforts matter? Do you ever find yourself busy trying to mentally prepare for the next meeting, or the next assignment, or the next chapter in your life, rather than being fully present in the current one? It’s natural and human to obsess over past mistakes or feel stress about what may be ahead of us. Yet every second spent worrying about a past or future moment distracts us from what is important in the here and now.”
We really need to rely on the atonement and not let the past or future make us forget what we should be focusing on now. From Richard G. Scott: Satan will try to use our memory of any previous guilt to lure us back into his influence. We must be ever vigilant to avoid his enticements. Such was the case of the faithful Ammonite fathers. Even after their years of faithful living, it was imperative for them to protect themselves spiritually from any attraction to the memory of past sins.

This is a tough one… or too easy? Not sure.

Tom’s Takeaways
1. Priorities (chapter 3)?“The word priority came into the English language in the 1400s. It was singular. It meant the very first or prior thing. It stayed singular for the next five hundred years. Only in the 1900s did we pluralize the term and start talking about priorities. Illogically, we reasoned that by changing the word we could bend reality.”? 2. The Main Thing (chapter 11)?“The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing” —Stephen R Covey?Story of his daughter, Cynthia?Story of Clayton’s weekend meeting? 3. Room to Breathe (chapter 15)?“It is as if we are driving one inch behind another car at one hundred miles an hour. If that driver makes even the tiniest unexpected move— if he slows down even a little, or swerves even the smallest bit— we’ll ram right into him.”?Parable of the 10 Virgins —Matthew 25:1–13? 4. A Mind Invited to Play (chapter 7)?“The value of play in our lives can’t be overstated. Studies from the animal kingdom reveal that play is so crucial to the development of key cognitive skills it may even play a role in a species’ survival.”?Joseph Smith— according to a cousin, George A. Smith, one convert-family apostatized because, when they arrived in Kirtland from the East, Joseph came downstairs from the room where he had been translating “by the gift and power of God” and began to romp and play with his children.? 5. Protecting the Asset (chapter 8)?“The best asset we have for making a contribution to the world is ourselves. If we underinvest in ourselves, and by that I mean our minds, our bodies, and our spirits, we damage the very tool we need to make our highest contribution.”?D&C 88:124 “Cease to be idle; cease to be unclean; cease to find fault one with another; cease to sleep longer than is needful; retire to thy bed early, that ye may not be weary; arise early, that your bodies and your minds may be invigorated.”???

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Learned in Primary Episode 007 — Essentialism

Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

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Love Leadership by John Hope Bryant – Learning in Primary Episode 006

Welcome to Learned in Primary, where we discuss that everything we know we learned in primary. This podcast focuses on the things that we are learning as adults that remind us of what we learned as children growing up in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Join hosts Jethro Jones and Tom Bay as they discuss the current hot topics in thought leadership and how they relate to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

You can follow the show on twitter @learnedprimary and follow the hosts @tommybay and [@jethrojones](http://twitter.com/jethrojones. If you like what you are hearing, please subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and share it with your friends.

In this episode we discuss “Love Leadership” by John Hope Bryant. This podcast is not affiliated with the author of the book or the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Jethro’s Takeaways

  1. Loss Creates Leaders – “The storms of life offer an opportunity to respond in one of three ways to personal tragedy or loss: 1. You can give up. 2 You can try to cope using whatever dulls the pain most… 3. You can grow and create something useful out of your experience of loss. Joseph Smith in Liberty Jail pleads for relief from his afflictions. This is just one time he was persecuted, and the Lord’s response is so comforting:  ?

My son, peace be unto thy soul; thine adversity and thine afflictions shall be but a small moment; And then, if thou endure it well, God shall exalt thee on high; thou shalt triumph over all thy foes. D&C 121:7–8

  1. Fear Fails – “I’ve had a front-row seat for witnessing how fear destroys a community.” p 5. I looked up the phrase “fear not” in the Gospel Library app and found that that phrase was used 441 times. 249 times in the Old Testament, 85 times in the Book of Mormon, 76 times in the New Testament, 27 times in the Doctrine and Covenants, and 4 times in the Pearl of Great Price, so how about we don’t fear. ?

  2. Love Makes Money – “For a teenager, I was making a lot of money, and I got loud and overly confident about my newfound success. Over time, I have always found this combination to be a warning sign of impending failure.” p. 76 The Pride Cycle on LDS.org?

    Yea, and we may see at the very time when he doth prosper his people, yea, in the increase of their fields, their flocks and their herds, and in gold, and in silver, and in all manner of precious things of every kind and art; sparing their lives, and delivering them out of the hands of their enemies; softening the hearts of their enemies that they should not declare wars against them; yea, and in fine, doing all things for the welfare and happiness of his people; yea, then is the time that they do harden their hearts, and do forget the Lord their God, and do trample under their feet the Holy One—yea, and this because of their ease, and their exceedingly great prosperity. Helaman 12:2

  3. Vulnerability is Power – “Delivering bad news and admitting mistakes as soon as you become aware of them is one of the most powerful ways to show vulnerability…I find that bad news only gets worse if it’s left to drift on its own.” p 125 – #miracleofforgiveness?

  4. Giving is Getting – “If you want to have a prosperous, sustainable life, you’ll find it cheaper, smarter, and easier to do the work of love leadership. You will be better off in the long term if you inspire people, get them to believe in your vision, invest in them so they trust you, reward good behavior, build relationships. People will do the work they’re inspired to do rather than the work you force them to do.” p 157 – Why does our church not have paid ministers and still grow and be successful? Because we have a vision that is eternal and powerful. ?

Tom’s Takeaways

  1. What is Love?“Love, in the context of love leadership, is not the same as love for your life partner, love for your children, or even love for a big dish of chocolate ice cream. No, I refer to the agape definition of love found so frequently in the Bible: love meaning unconditional love for your neighbor, a love as powerful as humankind’s love for God. It means treating others as you want to be treated.”?Matthew 7:12— Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.?
  2. Christ Will Not Reject You?“What is it that people fear? People fear themselves. You have to love yourself and know that God loves you as you are. And what is it that most of us fear? Most of us fear rejection. We fear the emptiness and anxiety in our lives, and so we’re always looking for affirmation, understanding, acceptance from others.”?Religion frequently fails people here ^, but the true doctrine of Christ teaches this same thing.?“I believe that the whole purpose of life is to become comfortable in your own skin.”?
  3. I Care About You?By asking the other person about his or her family and children (and who doesn’t like talking about their children?) you send a message: I care about you, and I am interested in something beyond what I might get. From there I inquire about the person’s hobbies and interests beyond work, and ask my favorite question, “What are you passionate about?”?Home Teaching; Ministering “Home Teaching: Stop Saying these Words”?
  4. Leaders Build Ladders?“True leaders are ladder builders; they’re not ladder climbers,” he told me recently. “The ladder builder is always saying, ‘What can I do to help you? How would I make you successful?’ If you make your team successful, your team’s going to make you successful.”?
  5. Keep On Caring?John C. Mellott, the former longtime publisher of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, we are living through a “crisis of virtues.” Our habits of moral goodness have eroded. And we are all to blame. After the riots of 1992 in Los Angeles, I ran into a wall of indifference that is at the heart of this crisis of virtues. The long-term response to this tragedy was not, as I had hoped, an increased effort in healing and building community; instead, we witnessed a growing collection of private gated communities, private schools, private cars, and private jets. Everyone went back to his or her life of instant gratification and the day-to-day business of “getting” and asking “What’s in it for me?” As a friend said to me, “indifference is the death knell of the soul.”?Dallin H Oaks: “The gospel of Jesus Christ and the covenants we have made inevitably cast us as combatants in the eternal contest between truth and error. There is no middle ground in that contest.”?

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Next month’s book: Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown

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Learned in Primary Episode 006 — Love Leadership

Love Leadership

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Stuffocation – Learned in Primary Episode 005

 

Welcome to Learned in Primary, where we discuss that everything we know we learned in primary. This podcast focuses on the things that we are learning as adults that remind us of what we learned as children growing up in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Join hosts Jethro Jones and Tom Bay as they discuss the current hot topics in thought leadership and how they relate to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

 

You can follow the show on twitter @learnedprimary and follow the hosts @tommybay and @jethrojones. If you like what you are hearing, please subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and share it with your friends.

 

In this episode we discuss “Stuffocation” by James Wallman . This podcast is not affiliated with the author of the book or the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

 

Experientialists Quiz: http://stuffocation.org/expquiz/

 

 

Jethro’s Takeaways

  1. And finally, what do I, a cultural forecaster, think?”
  1. And what would a man of faith say about stuffocation? probably that it takes us away from God and makes stuff our idols.
  1. “Despite occasional victories, like the banning of the CFCs that harmed the ozone layer, environmental damage has only gotten worse through the years. The runaway success of consumerism is now not only causing what may be irreversible climate change, for instance, but also, which is perhaps worse, the greatest extinction of plant and animal species since the dinosaurs died out. Materialism might mean that whole swaths of our planet could one day wake up, as Rachel Carson foretold, to spring mornings that are entirely silent.”
  1. Stewardship is the right way to look at taking care of our planet. D&C 101:90: “And in his hot displeasure, and in his fierce anger, in his time will cut off those wicked, unfaithful, and unjust stewards, and appoint them their portion among the hypocrites, and unbelievers.” D&C 104:55–56: “Behold, all these properties are mine…And if the properties are mine, then ye are stewards; otherwise, ye are no stewards.” Moses 2:28, the Lord gave dominion over everything to Man: “And I, God, blessed them, and said unto them: Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it, and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.”
  1. The world is not, it must be said, quite as flat as a pancake. There are still peaks of influence. The government is still far more influential than most individuals. And the world’s big media and advertising companies, like Disney, Google, and News Corp, are certainly more likely to influence what you and I think and do, and especially when and how we spend our money.
  1. Imagine the peak of influence that our church leaders have over some other peaks. who are we more willing to give out time and attention to?
  1. One path that most governments and businesses do not want us to go down is minimalism. Why would they, when their economic and financial models are based on materialism, on us wanting and buying more? If the government, industrialists, and advertisers who rely on materialism had it their way, there would be no mention of minimalism.
  1. the Lord however would probably prefer a minimalist lifestyle – Matthew 6:19–21
  1. “19  Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal:
  2. 20  But lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal:
  3. 21  For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”
  1. One consequence of this is that people sacrifice too much life to get more stuff. Experientialism.
  1. We have been commanded to be experientialists for many years, since April 1843, at least. D&C 130:18–21
  1. 18 Whatever principle of intelligence we attain unto in this life, it will rise with us in the resurrection.
  2. 19 And if a person gains more knowledge and intelligence in this life through his diligence and obedience than another, he will have so much the advantage in the world to come.
  3. 20 There is a law, irrevocably decreed in heaven before the foundations of this world, upon which all blessings are predicated—
  4. 21 And when we obtain any blessing from God, it is by obedience to that law upon which it is predicated.

 

 

 

 

Tom’s Takeaways

  1. The Dark Side of Materialism
    “In today’s culture, material goods have become substitutes for deep and genuinely meaningful human desires and questions.”
    This is a problem, not exclusively caused by the love and pursuit of material goods, but you can certainly see its influence. I feel like we hear our church leaders constantly encouraging us to make and take time to study, reflect, and discuss things of a higher (spiritual) nature. The recent talk that came to my mind was the Ponderize talk by Devin Durrant, “[My Heart Pondereth Them Continually](https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2015/10/my-heart-pondereth-them-continually?lang=eng)
    “I promise you will not regret writing a verse of scripture on your mind and heart each week. You will experience a feeling of perpetual spiritual purpose, protection, and power.”
  2. Learning from History
    To give some context to our current ‘stuffocation’ problem, Wallman talks about the Original Mad Men and walks through the history of materialism. The Lord has commanded us to bring context to our lives in similar fashion: to study history via His scriptures.
  3. “Not simple, but simpler living.”
    I really liked this point from Wallman in Chapter 6. He retouches on it in his conclusion, too, saying that the extremes probably aren’t the right answer for most people. It made me think of the wealthy man who asked Christ what good think he could do to have eternal life and the Savior told him to give everything to the poor and follow him. [Matthew 19:16–22](https://www.lds.org/scriptures/nt/matt/19.21) That is definitely not a commandment he gave to everyone.
  4. Materialism in the East — Missionary opportunities?
    The influence of Western materialism was slow to reach folks in Eastern countries like China, Mongolia, Russia, etc. But, as Wallman points out, it’s there now and expanding. I hope that this becomes a stepping stone to the fulfillment of the prophesies that the gospel will roll forth “until it has filled the whole earth.” D&C 65:2
  5. “How should we live to be happy?”
    I think the gospel helps to answer this question along with the question’s extension: How should we live to be happy… in this life and the next. We’ve been given a pretty clear picture (or plan) of how best to approach this life and I believe their is room to accomplish a happy, obedient life both with and without material wealth. I do believe that it’s our Heavenly Father’s intention for our lives to be abundant.
    “Memories live longer than dreams.”

 

Our next book is Love Leadership by John Hope Bryant

 

Thanks for listening to our show!

 

Please take a minute and rate this show: http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1031586002

 

 

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